Skip to main content

About your Search

20130801
20130831
STATION
CSPAN 26
MSNBCW 25
MSNBC 20
CNNW 9
CSPAN2 9
KGO (ABC) 3
CNN 2
WMAR (ABC) 2
WRC (NBC) 2
KNTV (NBC) 1
KPIX (CBS) 1
LANGUAGE
English 120
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 120 (some duplicates have been removed)
opportunities that, you hopeful will be in iowa's and america's future. studies have shown that throughout the united iowa, that also in all growth in workforce in the 30 years will be attributable to immigrants. because of this demographic of retiring baby-boomers and the after them.oming and, of course, also, i think, alluded to, we also need to fill jobs that are currently here. need to create jobs, we need innovation. this is where immigrants have contributed to america as well. immigrants are more likely as a roup to start businesses, immigrants are more likely to have a patent when they're high-tech the industries and that than native foreign counterparts. and then finally, we have to we live in a small world. we can't isolate america from rest of the world. economy.'s true for our and so therefore our economy is sum game. our workforce is not a zero sum game. usinesses and workers adapt to changing policies and circumstances. so we work with the rest of the a sense we're in competition for the rest of the world. or exports, imports, and workforce. so immigration from the business sh
of america through the senses. the population reached 17 million in 26 states. we consistently see 30%. slaves #2.5 million, which is almost 15% of the population, and new orleans joins the list of the largest cities in the united states. we heard about the tylers and their attitude toward slavery. give us an indication of what was happening in 1840. >> this is a tremendous time of sexual tension. we like to think the country is divided regionally, that everyone in the north is anti slavery and everyone in the south is proslavery. it is not that simple. people in the north benefited from slavery and the slave trade until it was ended. they now move into a different economic arena. they no longer need slavery, and slippery as a threat to them because of the free labor system in the north, and the kinds of the economy that is needed to preserve institutions in the north are different from those in the south, so what is happening in congress is both groups want to control legislation, because if you are in more industrialized regions, we want certain parts of laws passed to preserve the
. >> democracy is at its best when they all have a seat at the table. but in america there's a big gap. we need more women in office. >> men hold 82% of the seats in the house of representatives. a decade ago, our nation ranked ninth 57 nations as a percentage of women in congress. today we are 92nd. out of 50 governors come just five are women. that's 10%, the same percentage as the number of women mayors in the 100 largest cities. out of more than 7000 state legislators, fewer than one in four are women. that's barely higher than it was two decades ago. at this rate women will be underrepresented in the united states for another 500 years. a century ago in 1920, the decades long struggle for women to win the righ right to vocal e in the 19th amendment to the constitution. inspired by that struggle, representation 2020 takes on this centrist challenge for women. we must have parity for women in office. that will happen when any given election a woman is just as likely as a man to win and in any given legislature, women will be just likely told them. i founded the white house project where we t
've heard this kind of talk before. but america is a different country. voters are rejecting 40 years of gop scare tactics. voters are supporting the obama administration's move to end severe mandatory sentences for low-level nonviolent drug offenders. of course, over at fox, they don't get it. >> they're not pot smokers. they're not pill poppers. >> wait a second. 50%. but the thing, what if the kid has a drug problem? >> then you get the kid to rehab or lock him in the basement or do what you have to do. that's what parents do. >> who thinks that one of these elderly people who have been in prison for a mandatory minimum sentence, that they're going to get out and they're not going to be on public assistance? of course they are. >> so we should keep people in prison to keep them off public aid? we should just lock up people with drug problems. this kind of demonizing and fearmongering is really nothing new for the right. it goes all the way back to president richard nixon. >> america's public enemy number one in the united states is drug abuse. in order to fight and defeat this enemy, it i
a massive outbreak of measles in america. well, some people are blaming some christian teachings. >>> and a montana teacher is convicted of raping a 14-year-old student. why did the teacher only get 30 days in jail? days in jail? >>> let's go "outfront." -- captions by vitac -- www.vitac.com >p >>> "outfront>>> "outfrn drumbep drumbeat to wdrurn drumbep drumbeat to wdrum louder. wall street suffered its worst day since june as the obama administration clearly laid the groundwork for a possible military strike on syria. >> there's no doubt who is responsible for this heinous use of chemical weapons in syria. the syrian regime. the president believes and i believe that those who use chemical weapons against defenseless men, women and children should and must be held accountable. >> market analyst todd schoenberger is "outfront" with us tonight. thank you for being here. how much of the drumbeat you heard from the vice president and the president and the administration about oil in the region? >> quite a bit because it's a grave concern for everybody at wall street. it was top of mi
. if you work 20 years in america, paid into social security, on someone else's number and you can prove it, not worth anything. .. must present a government i.d. with a photo. the employer enters this into a computer in the e-verify system and watches for the photograph to come up. if the official government photograph for that name doesn't match the one that they have in their hand, you can't be hired. so this is going to make the work place a lot tougher and any employer who hires someone who doesn't match up, they're subject to fines an penalties. and finally, i think it was hector who told the story about overstaying a visitors visa. 40% of the undocumented people in america overstayed their visas, visitors, tourists whatever they may be. we'll have a system under this law that will track people not only as they come in on visas but as they leave on visas. this is a tough enforcement bill and those who say it isn't haven't taken a look at it. when it comes to the border, i will tell you something i had to grit my teeth as they put another 700 miles of fence and billion dollars on the b
defined by what you lost, by what you can't do. you've inspired america with what you can do. maybe you lost your sight but you can still see the truth that our disabled veterans make extraordinary contributions to our country every single day. maybe you lost an arm but you still have the strength to pick up a friend or neighbor in need. maybe you lost a leg but you still stand tall for the values and freedoms that make america the greatest nation on earth. [ applause ] i think of the wounded warrior who spoke for so many of you when he said your life will never be the same but that doesn't mean you can't go on to do amaze things with the second thing you've given. i think of wounded veterans across america and how they used that second chance. volunteering in communities. building home, being a mentor to local kids, showing up after tornadoes, after hurricane sandy to help folks rebuild. i think of the wounded warriors who reached out to the survivors of the boston marathon bombing with a simple message, we stand with you. i think of all the inspiring wounded warriors that michelle and
in america. it's increasingly in the suburbs. if you look at polls out recently, four out of five of adults in this country will in this country at some point struggle with poverty, possibly have to accept food stamps. so this -- i think sometimes some people sort of focus on this old idea of poverty that it's in certain areas, in the inner city. i think we have ronald reagan in many ways to thank for that consistent image about poverty and about people who are poor and taking advantage of the system. it's just not true. poverty is much more widespread. it crosses much more demographics racially than it has in many, many years. and it's very sad. i think you're going to see somebody like cory booker who looks like he will be the negotiation senator from new jersey, he is somebody who wants to come in and really talk about the poverty. the democratic party i think for many years have not wanted to talk about poverty. and it looks like along with folks like karen bass and cory booker, they're going to have these champions to talk about poverty. >> well, you know, i've been around the country,
an all latino comedian panel covering immigration, and issues. and two weeks, al jazeera america takes over current tv. but tonight's f-bomb deals with the outrageous racism. and this is the birthday of patrick ewing, and the late great adam of the beasty boys who would have been 49 years old today. 47 years ago today the beatles released revolver, the greatest album of all time, and a young ronald reagan once said where free unions and collective bargaining is lost, we lose the middle class. this is "viewpoint." [♪ theme music ] >> john: good evening, friends, i'm john fugelsang this is "viewpoint." the latest case of minimum rage spilled out into the streets. thousands of fast-food workers walked off of the job. they want the right to unionize, and for the federal minimum wage to double from $7.25 an hour, to $15 an hour, and i call that a pretty good start. the image of a fast-food working has long been painted as a teenager. but the average age of a male employee is 29, and 32 for females. more than 25% of fast-food employees are the heads of their households. mcdonald's posted r
taxes. democrats want to give them more power? they want this agency involved in america's healthcare? no way. watchdogagency's own says the irs can't handle the job. , the inspector general stated they are not 'snfident about the irs ability to protect confidential information or protect fraud. neither am i. by any indication, neither are the american people. it has been three years since the healthcare law was passed. in less than two months, the administration claims it will be ready to implement the law. in the face of all these , more americans than ever want this law to be repealed. it is simple. increased healthcare costs to families and individuals. it has stifled individuals from expanding. it has forced job creators to cut hours. just yesterday, a key official could not confirm that the healthcare law was lowered in my home state of michigan. wasn't this the signature propolis -- promise of this administration? premiums would be lower. the administration cannot make good on that promise. with so little time before , it ises are set to open extremely concerning that the admin
of the united states of america and to the republic for which it stands, one nation under god, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all. the speaker: the chair will entertain up to five requests for one-minute speeches on each side of the aisle. for what purpose does the gentleman from illinois rise? mr. shimkus: i ask unanimous consent to address the house for one minute and to revise and extend. the speaker: without objection. mr. shimkus: thank you, mr. speaker. mr. speaker, i rise today to remember and recall the life of carla anderson. carla passed away on july 23, after a month-long fight against an infection. she was 52, a loving mother, devoted wife and deputy executive director of the next generation 911 institute. it was in this capacity that i had the privilege of working with her. technology continued to move forward, congresswoman anna eshoo and i worked closely as part of the congressional e-911 congress. she was part of legislation passed by congress to advance 911 services. in so doing, many lives have been saved. as first responders throughout the country could not on
. [booing] over the next 15 months, we are going to decide what kind of america we want to have. what kind of kentucky want to have. there are only two answers to this question. barack obama's vision for america. or kentucky's. ground -- crowd does not like it. kentucky's voice is often the voice of opposition. to the obama agenda. i am proud of that. that is why every liberal in america, every liberal in america have announced they will beat us next year. know, the liberals are worried because it just as i predicted obama care is a disaster for america. [applause] i fought them every step of the way, every step of the government takeover. up to their war on coal. look, as long as i am in the senate, kentucky will have a voice. [applause] all of these liberals to come down here to push me around, they are not going to get away with it, are they? ind paul, it would fill, and -- ed whitfield, and i take the fight every single day. let me give you an example. a few months ago thomas the cannots decided that you fish below the dams below the river anymore. up the group and we got together with
of violence in america calls each of us to collectively resist all forms of violence in our society. in particular, black on black violence that disproportionately affects every facet of black life in america. we must learn to live together in peace or we will most surely die apart in our own neglect. on the other hand, reaction on twitter. allen west tweeted, who will the president of the united states identify with this time? so we're starting to see more reaction on both sides of the aisle. ainsley, steve, brian, back to you. >> about time. thank you very much. >>> let's talk about the nsa. another revelation came out yesterday afternoon and it turns out that they have -- they have released additional information over the past -- since 2008 on things that have gone wrong in the nsa collection. for example, there was a redacted page which is unredacted and classified yesterday that revealed that we have collected 56,000 wholly domestic communications each year. so this is done, nothing was necessarily done with it. nothing was exposed by it. but these were collected and the fisa c
to everything in america, not only will you not get care tomorrow, we'll take the dollars you use to get care today, and the supreme court said that was an outrageous use of federal power. seems like there's lots of examples in the history, and in our present of using the tax code to treat some people in some states differently than we do people in other state, and to use the affordable care act as a hammer, not an approach, but the stick. did you consider those things -- do you agree with my analysis of those two circumstances as they exist today, and did you consider those in the analysis that you performed? congressman, yes, we are aware of the provisions that you -- >> the stick approach opposed to the cater approach. >> as i said in the review of the legislative history, the floor debates, there's no evidence that there was any discussion of the carrot stick approach in connection with the premium tax credits. >> okay. but it is consistent with past irs practice to treat folks in some states differently than we treat folks in other states based on statute? only those with income taxes ge
as you know is one of america's most influential voices on cultural, political and education issues. he's the senior pfizer to project lead the way and on the advisory board of -- a chief education adviser to be in stock innovation. he is taught at boston university the university of texas at harvard and served as secretary of education under president reagan and was america's first drug czar under president george h.w. bush. it was the author of more than 24 books including to new york times number one bestsellers and the host of the old bennett's morning in america and has received more than 30 honorary degrees and as a final note a very long time ago bill and i were philosophy students together at williams college. bill will speak in a minute. he will be followed by david wilezol the co-author of "is college worth it?." david is the associate producer of the nationally syndicated bill bennett's morning in america and a contributor to the manhattan institute's higher education policy blog and at claremont institute fellow and studied greek and latin at the catholic university in washi
, and will be replaced by al jazeera america. in our time here in "the war room" we have focused on important political stories from our march goes on series, to controlling the playing of gun violence in this country and the immigration reform debate that continues to rage on. joining me now inside "the war room" are two of my current colleagues and friends, john fugelsang, the host of "viewpoint, who has the second best hair on this network, and my very close friend, "the young turks" studio in los angeles cenk uygur. thank you both for joining us in "the war room" one last time. >> thank you, michael. >> thank you. >> michael: john, i'm sgoorth with you what do you think the impact that current tv has had on the progressive discussion if any at all? >> well, that's a good question. i have to say it was positive, if not necessarily profound. while this whole experience has proven that liberals are very good at capitalism, i'm very happy for mr. gore, i don't think network had the chance to make the proper impact it could have had had it had proper promotions behind it. i think if we would have had a
look outside the beltway from "special report." we'll be right back. [ male announcer ] america's favorite endless shrimp is back! people wait for this promotion all year long. and now there are endless ways to love it... from crispy to spicy to savory. [ man ] you cannot make a bad choice. [ male announcer ] red lobster's endless shrimp! as ch as you like, y way you like! you can have your shrimp. and you can eat it, too. [ male announcer ] try our new soy wasabi grilled shrimp or classic garlic shmp scampi. all just $15.99 for a limited time. it's gonna be a hit this year. [ male announcer ] red lobster's endless shri is now! we would neveriss endless shrimp. [ male announcer ] but it won't last forever. so come and sea food differently. icaused by acid reflux disease, relieving heartburn,orever. relief is at hand. for many, nexium provides 24-hour heartburn relief and may be available for just $18 a month. there is risk of bone fracture and low magnesium levels. side effects may include headache, abdominal pain, and diarrhea. if you have persistent diarrhea, contact your doct
shut the government down than continue to shut america down. >> it's not a bad thing at all. >> shut up, will you? >> this is political blackmail. that's what they are doing. >> you look them in the eye and you say, what is your positive replacement for obama care. they will have zero answer. >> that's not true. i've had an answer. >> they don't have a product to sell. >> it's not a bad thing at all. >> they are not rehabilitating. they a they are retrenching. >> i don't know why senator paul's so out of whack about this. >> the party's big enough for both of us. >> a healthy family debate is not a bad thing at all. >> i worked on my hair a long time and you hit it. >>> we've got a lot to get to today as egypt's interim cabinet met to discuss a way forward following bloody days of conflict. first, president obama heads to new york and pennsylvania to promote education as an engine of economic growth. he's not the only one hitting the road in the days ahead. chris crossing the country to build support for a plan to defund oak care by shutting down the government. it may still be obvious,
, and the schools, no account teachers, and let's bring in teach for america clubs, open up charter schools in the district, and that's the model, the idea that's been propagated for the last decade plus under republican administration and a democratic administration. it is just the latest in a series of silver bullets overredded up, and you can just change the structure and everything else changes, but i think what union city teaches is -- or reminds us that -- is that there are a handful of time-tested, well-proven, well-established game changing strategies the school district can be done, and i'll say a word about that in a minute. why write about it? people forgot or took it for granted. it is almost like platitude, and any incompetenter with -- educator with a pulse will nod their head and say, sure. the trick is actually going from saying, yeah, that's a great idea to making it happen. in union city, you start with amazing preschool systems, and i know you are here someplace or another. where are you, suzie? [applause] i spent a fair amount of time in your class, and i walked in there
today for different reason. we had the same in latin america. people my grated to vens with a lay from countries such as peru on a consistent basis for half a century. it's a wealthier country than venezuela. look at it this way as well. chinese immigration in the united states has played a key role in the growing economic prosperity of china, they have not only of course been able to export stuff and import stuff to them. they invested in china response i think that borders and barriers are really art initial term of the impact on the economy. we all benefit from the constant circulation as people. the same is happening in europe. some of the eastern -- or central european countries have been -- in the last few years. it became legal to do so. and yet they have been becoming more and more prosperous. poland is more prosperous. it export the an incredible amount of people to spain. >> i have some small things to add. he's 100% right. about the german 1848ers. they left behind complained about the liberals leaving. americans who experienced and met them complained about the autocratic g
which america could take military action in syria this as calls grow to forcefully respond to evidence that the assad regime killed hundreds of its own people with chemical weapons. >>> the wildfire the size of the chicago raging in and around a cherished american landmark, the yosemite national park but the rim fire poses a threat to hundred of thousands of residents in san francisco and it is a 150 miles away. we'll tell you about that. >>> sentencing for the army major convicted of killing 13 people in the fort hood shooting massacre the will nidal hasan get life in prison or the death penalty. but first right now, brand new stories. >> inyou had concluding this one, jon, busted for buging? a new report says the nsa cracked videoconferencing system at u.n. and apparently that is not all. >>> plus jody arias is back before a judge. today we could learn when the retrial of the convicted killer's penalty phase will begin. >>> and there is talk about making an entrance? bandits storm a pawn shop. why what they got away with has police very worried. it is all happing right now. jon: good
. and this was a six-year-old when he came to america. this is him now. elaine quijano on how an afghan boy got his childhood back. uijaw captioning sponsored by cbs this is the "cbs evening news" with scott pelley. this is the "cbs evening news" wi >> schieffer: good evening. scott's on assignment. i'm bob schieffer. three young women were held captive for a decade in a dilapidated cleveland house where they were repeatedly raped and abused. but ariel castro, the man who pleaded guilty to the crime, said today it was everybody's fault but his and claimed the women were actually happy. judge michael russo was not convinced. he sentenced castro to life in prison without parole, plus 1,000 years. dean reynolds is at the courthouse. >> reporter: a shackled ariel castro scanned the courtroom today for a familiar face. there was at least one, michelle knight, one of the three women he imprisoned in his home fair decade of sexual and emotional brutality. she told the court and castro what it was like living in that house with its windows boarded up, trip alarms on the doors, the heavy chains, the pole th
'"i've been an america since birth." he refused to speculate whether or not he'd be eligible to run for president. he said he was going to leave that to legal scholars. >> you know, it's interesting that ted cruz, this has come to sort of bite him back, all of the worry about birth certificates and so forth have come back to bite ted cruz. that the reason being that basically that all this noise had been made over barack obama's birth certificate, and so now ted cruz is forced to litigate this, in my mind, ludicrous absurd issue precisely because there was such a long sustained movement on the american right to question barack obama's birth certificate and whether he, himself, could actually be president of the united states. >> reporter: a couple things on that. cruz was asked, also, if there are any similarities between his situation and questions about his citizenship, and the questions that president obama faced that eventually led him to release his long-form birth certificate. cruz also refused to speculate on that. so he wouldn't, you know, distance himself from it. he also w
to the british government that we had this material already in america and glenn greenwald has it in brazil, it seemed to me to misunderstand the nature of digital communications to be destroying a hard disk in london. but as they were adamant they would go to law, i thought it was simpler to get on with the reporting from america and destroy the copies that we had in london. >> which means agents from the uk government came to "the guardian's" offices with, what, sledgehammers? with -- i mean, honestly, how did it -- like, physically, how did it go down? there was a hard drive on the floor and you watched as agents of the government battered the thing? >> well, this might seem a nice distinction, but i was not going to hand these, this material to the government in any way. so i said we would destroy it, but if they wanted to supervise the destruction, when they could. so they sent along two technicians from gchq. that's the equivalent of the nsa. and they advised on what you have to do in order to destroy a machine so that it is of no use to anybody else and nothing can be retrieved from
alone america. obama, call him a liberal or what you want but he was not on the fringe. he was down the plate of the democratic party. you have guys who are both not ready and also taking really wacko bird positions to -- >> at the same time, a lot of that has to do with the fact where you live and what your views are. there are a lot of people in middle america that don't see ted cruz or rand paul or marco rubio out of the mainstream. a lot of people. as many people don't think they are, as people don't think barack obama is. i mean barack obama -- >> they're not even in the mainstream of the republican party. barack obama was in the mainstream of the democratic party. he may have been inexperienced. >> when these guys came in 2010 they are in the mainstream of the republican party. look at the fact that in 2010 it's not like there were a couple people that snuck. >> office. republicans won the largest legislative landslide on the state and national level i think probably in the 20 -- in a century. it was a remarkable victory for them. the problem that some of them don't understand
states of america and i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman's time has expired. the gentleman from maryland reserves. the gentleman from california is recognized. mr. issa: at this time i'd like to yield one minute to the gentleman from north carolina. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from north carolina is recognized for one minute. >> thank you, mr. speaker. i'd like to address the individual from maryland, the gentleman from maryland as he lks about it's all about all employees and indeed it is because if we allow this continued behavior to go on, it tarnishes the good reputation workers that day in, day out serve this country and the citizens so well. mr. meadows: and what we're talking about is giving a tool, a management tool to let managers manage. we're talking about not giving bonuses, mr. speaker. we're talking about not giving bonuses to those that are at the very highest, the 1%, while the rank and file goes so many times without being recognized or compensated for what they deserve. you know, we're talking about employees that make
of america's most vocal critics. we shouldn't forget the difference between the ability of our government to collect information online under strict guidelines and for narrow purposes than the willingness of some other governments to throw their own citizens in prison for what they say online. >> stephanie: talking to you, putin. >> we're not there. >> stephanie: right. [ ♪ battle hymn of republic ] >> i'm with alan grayson. >> stephanie: what did edward snowden get wrong? everything. andrew lightman in the "l.a. times." we posted this up at stephanie miller facebook. snowden is out of his limbo. i hope the food is lousy, the winter is cold and the internet access is awful. >> it is russia. you're pretty much guaranteed all three of those. >> stephanie: i worry more about the damage snowden has done and could still do to strike the right balance between privacy and security. i do, too. he says those following snowden should understand two key points. first, though many things need to be kept secret in today's dangerous world, the line between secret and not secret is stark. the harsh t
, is the drug cartels and the violent side of is a demand for drugs in the united states of america. whether they have a submarine, like i have seen in colombia. it is a violent place when you have armed members bringing drugs across the border into our country. i do not excuse any action that .ook place but to somehow think it is not dangerous when cartel members are bringing drugs up to this country is not an adequate reading of the situation on the border, and i visit it all the time. said, i think the answer to our border control is technology. you have a point about additional border patrol. one of the things we need more of is customs people so we can .xpedite traffic back and forth there are some of us here old enough to remember we used to be able to walk across and have and walkedgales back. think about doing that today. you bring up problems on the border, and with this surveillance capability, we will people back,keep and then we will be able to send these teams out. finally, the coyotes. we know these coyotes are the worst scum of the earth people, and they are bringing people it
of the united states of america" is a biography and portrait of each first lady. it is now available for the discounted price of $12.95 plus shipping and can be found at c- span.org/products. the c-span town hall meeting that discusses the future of political parties. following that, nancy pelosi. after that, a town hall meeting with senator john mccain. >> this is a c-span townhall. you good tos away, have more of your say. during congress's recess, tuesday, wednesday, and thursday night on c-span, we are looking at public politics and talking to you about positions. welcome to c-span town hall tonight. we will ask you about the future of your political party. who is the future leader, the likely presidential candidate, and maybe it is somebody that is not necessarily yet on the national scene. a couple of ways for you to participate, by phone. we will open up the lines now. make sure you mute your television and radio when you call in. you can also use twitter. we will read tweets from members of congress who are back in their home states and districts for the august recess. some p
>>> good morning, america. this morning, breaking news. a massive multistate manhunt is over. >> she's coming home. >> hannah anderson rescued, her alleged kidnapper shot dead in the idaho wilderness by an elite fbi hostage rescuer. this morning, how the fbi got their man, and how hannah is doing now. >>> in reverse. gas prices plunging as the peak summer driving season comes to an end. plus, why we are likely to pay even less at the pump next year. >>> and the mystery and intrigue surrounding the most famous painting on earth. the high-tech researchers crawling into a crypt, perhaps on the verge of identifying the real mona lisa. >>> and are you smarter than an eighth grader from the year 1912? this is a recently rediscovered exam from more than 100 years ago. it's incredibly hard. >> who invented the cotton gin? >> man. >> no, i just -- >>> i have this exam right here. it's incredibly embarrassing. describe the battle of quebec. who first discovered the following places, florida, pacific ocean, the mississippi river, the st. lawrence river? >> you don't know who won the bat
exactly who he is talking about. in the meantime one of the most outspoken businessmen into america might try to pay his way into the white house, so he says. donald trump is willing to shell out big bucks for presidential bid in 2016. he had a short run campaign in the republican primaries but dropped out to back former governor mitt romney. "the donald" explaining just how far he is willing to dig into his wallet. >> if you were to run for president, how much would you be will to spend on your campaign? >> if i made a decision i would spend a lot. >> a modern presidential campaign can be half a billion dollars. >> can be or more. no, i would be willing to spend, if i did it i would spend whatever it took. jenna: if, if he did it. claiming a fortune more than $10 billion, trump said voters would see a man who built a company with tremendous net worth. he hasn't been totally forthcoming about how much money is actually in his companies which has been controversial over the last self years but that's what he says his company is worth. we'll take him at his word. >> he has been accused in t
is it all of a sudden america's fault? and i couldn't agree more with the previous callers that say we should not give any more money to any nation that behaves this way. detroit is bankrupt. sacramento, california, is bankrupt. we have huge, huge problems over here as far as infrastructure. i think we should take care of our own. i'm a first generation american and i can tell you, these countries, we give money -- they don't share our values, they don't share our beliefs, they don't have the same respect for human life that we do. we have absolutely no business giving them our money. i thank you very much. hubie: thank you, shane. from maryland. our next caller from ports myth, howe. good morning. caller: good morning. i enjoy your program here. just a quick comment about what's going on in egypt. people don't realize that they it -- america a pretty much put the president there before, and they lived under, generally, what america -- with freedom. now they have this muslim brotherhood guy who came in here and tried to slowly bring back shari'a law to this country. they'll people are
to corporate america about that one. maybe 75 days, two or three quarters max. but we make the long-term projections and in this the short term projection. one huge question i have that a lot of us had is the uncertainty just in the out years? we all know there's a huge amount of uncertainty about tomorrow. we're willing to go tomorrow? where will interest rates go tomorrow? based on what ben bernanke says or any other number of people. there could be an awful lot of fluctuation that can happen in the very near term. we saw earlier today would have been in the stock market over a brief period of time i think on jim's slide hitting it so we do not in our models in the deterministic models have that much enormous deflection in the near term. we have more deflection in the long term. but there's one other aspect of it. our stochastic model evin is based on having the individual parameters flecha bate around the extent to which the year to year fluctuations are in the past. we don't have built in either perimeter of certainty or what we sort of think of as the sort of central tendency v
. says america who isn't free and runs off to china and russia to tell about it is not exactly my idea of a great american patriot. i do put a lot of trust in the people who had defended the united states of america their entire careers with distinction and with honor and with the .alor when they walk in and tell me, this is what it is and we are not doing this and you're not doing that and we're not doing this and we asked them the question, then i have got to listen to that before i jerked the rug out from under them. congress is looking at this. it will continue. you, i always worry about the concentrations of power and and eventual liberty. i think that is what keeps free, that individual citizens are passionate about you havethe same time, these abuses. you have got to know where they and i do not think we have lost these freedoms. had, we would not be having this conversation on c- span. it is not china. there is the fbi case and they lost that case -- >> [indiscernible] >> we will see what happens. >> [indiscernible] the consent of the court -- [applause] in the presidential ele
as you know is one of america's most influential voices on cultural political and educational issues. he's a senior at visor at project lead the way and on the advisory board of audacity.com and chief education advisor to -- he has taught at boston university university of texas and harvard and served as secretary of education under president reagan and was america's first drug czar under president george h.w. bush. that was the author of more than 24 books including two "new york times" number one bestsellers and a host of bill bennett's morning in america has received more than three honorary degrees bill and i were philosophy students together to bill will speak in a minute and he will be followed by david wilezol the co-author of kathleen tighe. david is the associate producer of the ashley syndicated bill bennett's morning in america contributor to mining the campus a policy blog. in his honor i tried to come up with an opiate let end quote addressing student debt and i suggest -- that is happy is he who has no debt. [laughter] >> that's good. [laughter] we look forward to your pres
there are 40 million muslims in america? these images that's we see of burning vehicles, they will be everyday. host: ok, to a for the call. this is from marie -- obama got us into this debacle in egypt prompting me muslim brotherhood. there is this headline, the journalists among the dead in egypt, including the husband and a former "post" reporter who was killed. more details on mick deane, who was killed in cairo. a statement from the british prime minister david cameron who paid tribute to the reporter on twitter -- i am sad to hear the death of cameraman mick deane. my thoughts are with his family and a sky news team. my next call is rich from fairfax, virginia. republican, good morning. caller: thank you for taking my call. i was disgusted last night was watching the news, and i saw a caterpillar bulldozer into their where thesehe area people were. that equipment i'm sure was bought with money the united states gave the egyptian army. i just think of how that equipment is used in this country, to build things, and we are over there destroying stuff. it just makes me sick. we need to stop
into this sort of nonsense, he ends up being the image that the rest of america gets about republicans. and people like lamar alexander and everybody else who is complaining about all of this, they are offering him this vacuum because they are unwilling to anger the folks that are going to vote in the primary by going out and offering some leadership instead, they're letting cruz become their voice to get the base fired up which is good for cruz, but as everybody has suggested, it just isn't good for the republican party and the general election. when you start this stuff about blinking, you end up with confrontation that leaves the country in a standoff mess. >> you're talking about a guy actually running for president and using this language and actually asking the american people i guess implicitly to give him the nuclear football. give him the buttons, give him the codes. a guy like that who talks and thinks like this in these cold war terms given the power to blow us up. i mean, at one point do you separate just good rhetoric and rabble-rousing with possibly governing this country
for america from the steps of the lincoln memorial. his indelible words a watershed moment in the civil rights movement. today thousand also gather to commemorate the famous words that forever changed our country. >> 50 years ago there was so much fear, people were afraid to be afraid. the fear is gone. our country is better and we are a better people. we still have a distance to go. >> reporter: that distance front and center today as the nation's first black president will add his vision as the marquee speaker at the anniversary celebration. president obama acknowledges that, while a lot of progress has been made, king would not be satisfied. >> we have not made as much progress as the civil and social progress that we've made, and that it's not enough just to have a black president. >> reporter: there are renewed calls for addressing socioeconomic and racial disparities. the recent acquittal of george zimmerman and the shooting death of trayvon martin drew many to the streets across the country with protests. the president acting with candor. >> there are very few african-american in this c
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 120 (some duplicates have been removed)

Terms of Use (31 Dec 2014)